The Stitch – Episode 110

This month, Lynn and Pam discuss cheating in quilting, online classes, and class etiquette.

Links and items mentioned in this episode:

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Thanks to our sponsor 77peaches and partner Big Think Productions!

 

Author: Pam

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7 Comments

  1. Thanks for another fun episode! I love the Double Wedding Ring quilt with that red background and amazing quilting!!

    Class pet peeve: This is not limited to quilting or craft classes. Someone who asks incessant questions making it impossible to move on. Especially if there are all kinds of random hypotheticals. (“If I’m using blue fabric where you used pink fabric, do I still use a quarter inch seam allowance?”) Bonus points if the teacher asked for questions to be held until the end and the person interrupts anyway.

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  2. Well I think there is a direct relationship between watching or listening to videos and books at a faster rate is a form of cheating.
    Cheaters usually try to justify their cheating in some way like, “I’ve got things to do…”
    I’m just saying…
    :-)=

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  3. I agree that some Double Wedding Ring template sets/dies/rulers make the rings look squished or bumpy and I don’t like those either. If I am going to go to the trouble of making a DWR, I want RINGS.

    I am glad you mentioned Quilt University. When you started on the topic, I was remind of them and wondered what had happened to them. Back in my day (say that with a warbly old man voice) Quilt University was the only game in town and video wasn’t an option because not everyone had broadband. I took an EQ class and we got written instructions and would follow them in the allotted time for the lesson, then we would all post our projects and go to the next lesson. It wasn’t ideal for many types of projects, but it worked for EQ. I still have the manual I printed from the class and though I am on a different version, I still refer to it for certain tricky maneuvers.

    What about CreativeBug? Have either of you tried that?

    I agree that it is important to respect the teacher, but I also think that if they put themselves out as an expert, they need to be an expert. If they say an Ohio Star block is their own design, then that is a clear indication of disrespect of my knowledge of quiltmaking and shows that they are not an expert. It is important to respect quiltmaking as well. I don’t mind people teaching who do not put themselves out as experts, but may be showing something the way they do it. I guess I am trying to say that honesty is important as well. Not everyone knows everything and it is worse if you pretend that you do.

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    • Another great episode. You two are so funny!

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  4. So enjoy each show! Makes for a fun evening of sewing.

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  5. Hi Lynn & Pam!

    I took on line classes at Quilt University before there was anything else. Carol Miller was the dean and her husband Roger was the IT department. You received a link and a password and you could log in. There were very detailed class instructions with pictures, a discussion space to ask questions of the instructor and other classmates and a page for posting your own photos. I took all kinds of classes from some very good instructors in this format. When Carol passed away several instructors took over the venture and changed the name to the Academy of Quilting. Many of the instructors moved to the new venture. The format worked for most students and gave access to classes to quilters around the world many of whom would never have the opportunity to take a quilting class. It also gave USA quilters access to instructors in other countries.

    Today I take Craftsy classes for the same reason. It allows access to instructors that many would not have access too in the real world. Quilters in the Atlanta area have access to quilt shops, guilds and instructors that the majority of quilters do not. On line training with today’s video and computer options is light year’s ahead of just reading a book. Having the opportunity to review things more than once or watch in slow motion while you are sitting at the machine is a huge bonus to new quilters and others that struggle with reading and understanding poorly written instructions :-).

    Along with the pay for access classes there are lots of free you tube videos and bloggers tutorials available if you have teh patience and or skill to search for them.

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